Checking in from Phnom Penh

Bayon Temple near Angkor Wat

Hello again!

Just wanted to check in quickly before I fly out tomorrow morning to visit my cousin and her family in Singapore.  Everything has gone really well here in Cambodia.  The past few week included some fun venturing out and exploring parts of Phnom Penh on my own while Katy and Alan were in meetings.  I’ve enjoyed visits to Wat Phnom, Central Market, the National Museum, and the Royal Palace.  We just returned from a quick weekend trip to a seaside town, Kep.  The place we stayed was up the mountain a little ways and we had a great view of the mountain and the sea… one of my favorite combinations.  🙂

I need to get back to repacking, but wanted to share a few more observations, highlights, etc. from my time here.  I head off to “the antithesis of Cambodia” (Singapore) tomorrow.  We met up with a man who has lived in both countries last week and that was how he described it to me.

  • I wasn’t allowed into the Royal Palace last Wednesday due to my non tank top shirt’s lack of sleeves.  Oops!  I returned Thursday more appropriately dressed.  🙂
  • After my tour, I went back in to take a few more pictures of the Silver Pagoda at the Royal Palace. Everyone had left for lunch, so I had the place to myself to take pictures of the beautiful gardens and stuppas around the pagoda… it was very peaceful and a nice break from the city for a few minutes.
  • The amount and variety of items that I’ve seen balanced on bicycles and motos here is unbelievable (from IV bags attached to people to live chickens to rice bags to TVs and hundreds of other things).
  • Cambodians always return your change (bills- they don’t use coins) using both hands (something I didn’t realize until a couple days ago… another cultural mistake I’ve made!)
  • On Wednesday I got to buy some fabric in a home on stilts with bamboo floor from the woman who made the fabric on the looms under the house… it was a really unique experience.
  • When you get gasoline at the stations, they thank you/try to get you to return business by giving you pop cans and tissues… it kind of feels like you’re getting treats for buying gas there.  And who knew that they still make Pepsi Twist in other countries!?
  • We went to church on an island that used to be a killing field.  We took a boat to get to it… I think that’s the first time I’ve ever had to take a boat to get to church.
  • They sang a song at church called God is Good (in Khmer) that I loved to sing in my church in Honduras in Spanish.
  • The Khmer people are very friendly.  Kids love to yell hello when they see foreigners.
  • They have these raquet things here that have the special light and shock thing to use as a mobile bug zapper.  best.invention.ever.
  • Alan and Katy’s neighborhood has a bunch of dogs that like to sing together in harmony a few times every night. That, plus some repetitive croaking (or maybe its chickens… I really can’t identify the animal that never stops making noise), plus some roosters thrown in, make for lovely white noise to fall asleep to.  Here is a clip Alan made of the dog choir:  http://www.alanandkaty.blogspot.com/2012/02/dog-choir.html
  • The Daughter’s Project girls are currently making some purses.  When they make a hundred, they get to go out for ice cream.  When we arrived on Friday, over a hundred were completed.  They’re excited for ice cream now.
  • A woman who was at church on Sunday and we saw again Wednesday told Katy that I’d gained weight since Sunday.  Apparently Cambodian food agrees with me.  🙂
  • I’ve found that my taxi bargaining skills that I perfected in Honduras have transferred pretty well to getting a TukTuk deal.
  • Crossing the street here is quite the experience.  You kind of follow the same rule that the moto and car drivers follow:  pull out without looking and then look left right left right left right left the whole way until you make it to the other side.  It’s very much like a game of Frogger.
  • It’s really nice to be able to skype with my sister in Australia when we’re both in similar time zones.
  • Have I mentioned that it’s really hot and humid here?!  Thankfully the experience of getting to know Khmer people, their culture, and their country makes it worth it.  🙂

Well that’s it for now.  I hope you’re well and staying cool whever you are!

The not-so-relaxing fish foot massage in Siem Reap

With Katy and Alan in Phnom Penh

With Katy and Olympic Stadium in Phnom Penh

One response

  1. Pingback: Katy, Alan, and Jonah: Visiting from Cambodia « jenni mansell photography blog

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